PDA

View Full Version : Upright pasting table??



HangingInThere
01-05-2008, 02:22 PM
Many moons ago when I was but a residential lad, I happened to see an upright pasting table on a commercial job. Probing back into my synaptic archives I seem to recall that the table was made of aluminum. The bolts were attached to the back, material came over the top, and one could roller paste on a slightly inclined surface.

Unfortunately, I did not see the table in operation. I don't believe the table was more than 6 ft, so the material would be pasted and booked upward from the bottom...pulled down farther to match ceiling height...pasted and cut. It appeared there was a straight edge at the top for trimming a 90, but the hitch would be once trimmed, the sheet would "free fall" unless somehow restrained.

I've a Beta 5 Pastemate, but a 30 yard bolt and oft times space constraints don't warrant cranking it up, especially with some of my designers opting for 54" in residential installs.

One of these seemed like the answer to my dilemma.

I've tried to Google for it, but am not having any success...any ideas??

Chris Murphy
01-05-2008, 03:06 PM
http://www.pastewell.com/workstations.html (http://http//www.pastewell.com/workstations.html)

HangingInThere
01-05-2008, 03:11 PM
Chris, the link does not work... :confused:

Chris Murphy
01-05-2008, 03:27 PM
http://www.pastewell.com/workstations.html

This is a lot of work for a non-member, ya know :deadhorse:

HangingInThere
01-05-2008, 03:27 PM
Chris, I checked the Pastewell website and see that they have a "work station" which appears to be the work surface minus the actual Pastewell... Is that what you're referring to??

If so, what I saw was less cumbersome. It appeard that with its aluminum characteristics that it could be folded neatly into an easily toted unit...

HangingInThere
01-05-2008, 03:30 PM
Helping me is optional!! :help: Non-member and all that... :cry:

HangingInThere
01-05-2008, 03:57 PM
The design was more like an "A" frame. I've used plywood on sawhorses, but that takes up a lot of real estate.

Chris Murphy
01-05-2008, 04:03 PM
I was just bustin' your chops, as I guess you could tell. The Pastewell unit is the only one I know of, unless there are home-made ones out there. I've seen one, and home-made pull boxes, too. Pastewell stuff is inexpensive enough that I'd figure it'd be more efficient to buy theirs. That unit on their site has a pastewell on it, but the machine must be ordered separate, the way I took it.
i don't mind helping other paperhangers. I also don't mind when they help me out by joining the NGPP. Know any of the members up there?

HangingInThere
01-05-2008, 04:24 PM
Know any of the members up there?No. I work solo and keep a pretty low profile and haven't ever done any advertising. Just happened to catch the link to the Guild forum off my Google search.

If what I'm looking for is not available through a manufacturer, and I'm really motivated (been thinking about one of these for a number of years now) I may just have to look into building my own prototype...

Yes, I figured you were just giving me a rough time... :D

jim27577
01-05-2008, 06:15 PM
I knew a guy in L A years ago that had one like you are describing but I don't know where you would find one. He made his.It would fold to about the size of a small box with wheels. You pulled the material over the top and rolled the paste on.

HangingInThere
01-05-2008, 06:45 PM
Jim, thank for the reply! Yep, sounds like the exact principle... Maybe I'll be making one... I just know that aluminum sounds wonderful...and light! I'M sure it'll take a bit before others stop by and perhaps provide some insight...

In the meantime, I guess I'll take a trip to the metal store in Minneapolis and see what they have as far as aluminum channel etc., and see if any stock items might be able to fill the bill...

Chris Murphy
01-05-2008, 08:59 PM
Chris, I checked the Pastewell website and see that they have a "work station" which appears to be the work surface minus the actual Pastewell... Is that what you're referring to??

If so, what I saw was less cumbersome. It appeard that with its aluminum characteristics that it could be folded neatly into an easily toted unit...

You saw their Upright Station, right?

eyecor
01-05-2008, 09:05 PM
The ones I have used are indeed light. They seem to last forever when banged back together periodically. You can indeed make one, but there are some complicated supports you need to build to keep the lightweight galvanized sheet metal from buckling while you are pasting. A union shop in Denver, by the name of Heggem-Lundquist Painting makes their own. Maybe they can help you out.
David

HangingInThere
01-06-2008, 01:53 AM
You saw their Upright Station, right?Yes. Not the same principle...semantics in the naming "upright" I suppose...

As I mentioned, these are "A" framed. You don't need space to walk backward to expose material for pasting. You don't need much real estate to be able to operate one.

Also, thank you David for the Denver lead!! Good to know someone other than me has actually seen one, and better yet, actually used one. I was beginning to think it was just one of those lucid dream things... :)

HangingInThere
01-06-2008, 02:17 AM
Oh David, how were these actually used? Could they accommodate a full 8' sheet, or were you pasting, say 6', booking, and then the balance?? Would you give me some idea as to their size, etc.?

Lillian
01-06-2008, 04:41 PM
This paperhanger that helped me on a job had an A Frame Setup. I loved it.
The paste machine sat on top of the slightly angled boards. He poured the adhesive in the paste machine. He pulled the paper through. It had a great cutting guide on the front. It allowed the vinyl to be cut very straight.
He could fold ( book ) it and lay it to the side. By being the A frame design, he was able to store tools and supplies on the floor of the set up. That allowed him to pull the machine and supplies where needed. It had rollers,so it was able to go through the door ways and halls and etc. I'm sorry I do not have any pictures. If this sounds like anything you are interested in. Please let me know as I can give you his number and e-mail address.
Also .... Welcome to this website and bulletin board. We would love to have you as a member. That way you can visit with us and hang out with some professional paperhangers at the Annual National Guild of Professional Paperhangers Convention ( say that one fast) , In Asheville North Carolina this September. We would love to have you attend. Bring the famly to see the Biltmore Estate. The largest home in America.!!!:thumbup:
My Best
Lillian

HangingInThere
01-06-2008, 04:58 PM
Lillian, thank you for the reply and for the welcome! The setup you describe sounds interesting... However, what I'm trying to avoid is setting up my paste machine with 30 yds or less. Or, precutting and pasting on a drop, or setting up a makeshift table on plywood and sawhorses.

The upright, as I'm describing it, I believe would be ideal for areas of limited maneuverability, provide ease of pasting, and cleanup, for smaller installs.

Someone is apparently already manufacturing these, or could possibly furnish me with a design so I can make one for myself.

Tim Bodine
01-06-2008, 10:40 PM
Personally, if I have a job with 30 yds or less, or don't feel like firing up the machine, I just brush/roll paste on the wall. Drop-n-rock we call it. :tiphat:

But I do recall years ago someone having something like what you describe. I think Carl Bergman up in Rockford, IL had one, but I might be mistaken.

HangingInThere
01-06-2008, 11:12 PM
Personally, if I have a job with 30 yds or less, or don't feel like firing up the machine, I just brush/roll paste on the wall. Drop-n-rock we call it. :tiphat:Yeah, when I've absolutely had to... But again, that requires an area to roll the bolt, knee work and duck walking... :( Type I...okay... Type II...hurts just thinking about it! :cry:

If the upright is as I've envisioned it...me thinks it might be the best of both worlds. Light, portable, convenient, no knee work, or duck walking... :thumbup:

If you would ask the individual you mention for a lead on it I would greatly appreciate it. :)

eyecor
01-11-2008, 07:25 PM
Hi H.I.T
The contraption I used was not very light-weight. It consisted of a base on wheels, with a folding 6'X3' table that mounted into it. As I said there were brackets to keep this folding table from sagging in the middle when you were pasting. There was also a frame to mount a supply bolt on the back. The paper was pulled over the top, pasted by hand, folded, often taped to hold it up while you cut it across the top. This needs to be done so that the new material does not slide off across the top. Normally a free hand is enough to hold the paper while you cut it. Not meant for production work, one helper will have trouble keeping up with two hangers, it is great for working in close quarters. When you are dealing with hundreds of offices, and 300' long hallways, it saves a lot of steps, and still allows people to get by your workstation. It is not difficult to paste 8 or 9' pieces this way, but longer goods would probably require an extra table for booking.
David

HangingInThere
01-11-2008, 08:57 PM
Thanks eyecor!!

I put in a call to Milo at Heggem-Lundquist. He returned my call this afternoon, but I was "at the wall" and unable to talk with him personally. I'll have to try him on Monday...

Russ Hayner
12-15-2008, 08:15 PM
http://www.pastewell.com/workstations.html (http://http//www.pastewell.com/workstations.html)

here is the current pastewell upright link http://www.pastewell.com/productline.html

dbayyz
09-13-2011, 03:27 AM
when I was an apprentice the company had 3 upright tables. I logged more than my fair share of time on them. The ones he had Leroy Hanson(Hansen?) on them. I do not know if that was the manufacturer or the designer.

dbayyz
09-13-2011, 09:59 AM
I knew it was LeRoy Hansen-As an apprentice I got sick of them. Now I would like to have one for small Jobs.


218421852186http://www.ngpp.org/lounge/images/smilies/headslap.gif